Tuesday, November 15, 2011

November Art Bead Scene Challenge Entry

In case you haven't been over the ABS blog to see the latest challenge, the photo image for this month is:

Madonna Pietra degli Scrovigni 
by Marie Spartali Stillman (1844-1927) 

This is the color palette to be used:


And rules require that an art bead (definition here) be included.



So here is my entry, the necklace I recreated for Madonna Pietra degli Scrovigni to wear in her portrait.


The piece contains two types of antiqued brass chain from Vintaj--a heavier piece in front and a slightly daintier piece in the back. 



The brass leaf is also a Vintaj piece to which I've added 3 colors of freshwater pearl nuggets to lighten and soften the look at the focal point.    The green and gold topaz colors, as well as the creamy white color, are each reflected in other parts of the necklace.  The pearls send a message to  us that this is a woman of some wealth.




Most of the necklace reminds us of the medieval period with the darkened chains, findings, and beads, and tell us that this is an heirloom piece.   However, there are also a few lighter parts to remind us that the necklace still has some  shine.  It also serves to call greater attention to the beads and her wealth, as well as her youth and beauty.

The real highlight of the necklace is this bar that runs horizontally and meets at the loops where the 2 types of chain switch.   A second piece of the lighter-weight chain drapes softly beneath the sparkly bar.  The bar is made of  copper wire permanently colored with gun metal bronze. 
It holds 3 good-size crystals in very light shades of amber and green which reflect the light beautifully.  Between the crystals are white ribbon glass spacer beads by TracyBell.   And on each end, a pearlized seed-bead in off-white complements the rich, lighter look.  


On the sides, olive green glass crystals with Vintaj brass flower-shaped bead caps also add to the drape of the piece and the look that the woman has people in her life who can afford to give her such jewels.


I really enjoyed creating for this month's challenge.  This is the first piece I've entered.   As much as I hate to part with it, this will likely be appearing soon in my ArtFire studio.   If Madonna Pietra degli Scrovigni doesn't get to wear it, hopefully someone will. 


Hope you enjoy all the challenges coming your way!  


--Sharyl


P.S. Be sure to take a look at the other entries for this month's ABS Challenge!   It seems this beautiful painting really inspired people to create some wonderful jewelry!  




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Image Credits:



Madonna Pietra degli Scrovigni, by Marie Spartali Stillman (1844-1927)  and Color Palette.  From Art Bead Scene Blog.  http://artbeadscene.blogspot.com/2011/11/november-monthly-challenge.html

Jewelry photos by Sharyl, Nov. 2011

Leaves:  http://www.designedtoat.com/clipart7/fall06.gif




6 comments:

T... said...

oh beautiful piece Sharyl...love the colours you had to work with...and what you've done with the pearls on the leaf.....love this piece....

Krista said...

Beautiful!

Sally Russick said...

Sharyl, your necklace is beautiful!! I really love the pearls on the leave!

Beadbug said...

Nice work the colors are amazing.

Mary C said...

I adore Pre-Raphaelite paintings. The one you had to work with is lovely. What a terrific job you did of designing something for her! Yes, I think Madonna Pietra would wear your necklace if she could.
Vintaj has some awesome components, don't they? I only have a few earrings made with items from their line because, unfortunately, the local store that I started to buy their products from discontinued them. *sigh* (Do buyers from those chain craft stores have any clue what is popular? I think not.)

Nice work, Sharyl.

Carole Meisenhelter said...

...such a beautiful story how you connected to the challenge portrait. How imaginative, and creative! I love what you came up with and I figure it took quite some nutting out to arrive at that outcome. The result is stunning and I wonder how many times you've stood in front of the mirror with it on, checking out every angle. Did I say fabulous result? Well done Sharyl!